Posts Tagged ‘music’

THE RECYCLED ORCHESTRA OF CATEURA

May 30th, 2016

The Recycled Orchestra of Cateura — a group of youth musicians from Paraguay that play instruments made entirely out of recycled garbage — have been brought to Vancouver by a local non-profit that has spent the last few years collecting disused instruments for the group.

Click the link below to listen.

CBC Radio Vancouver
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6:29 MINUTES

THE BIRTH OF CANADIAN INDIE: WINNIPEG

March 9th, 2012

Winnipeg musicians are deep thinkers. You only have to read a few liner notes for proof of that. And the cerebral undercurrent in Winnipeg’s music has a long history: the city’s been producing music with substance since the early days of its indie scene. In the mid-80s Winnipeg had an unusual number of politically–minded bands, one of which attracted the interest of a highly-regarded American punk label.

Julie Penner, violinist for Do Make Say Think, grew up in Winnipeg. She thinks Winnipeg’s isolation and its status as a “have not” province left a mark on its music scene.

“There’s a slight edge and maybe that edge is good for art,” she says. “Sometimes there’s a bit of bitterness, but it can also be a bitter creativity.”

In this episode of The Birth of Canadian Indie, we’ll hear about Winnipeg’s most political – and longest-lived – indie band. And we’ll hear from some of the many musicians they inspired.

Click the link below to listen.

CBC Radio 3
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7:21 MINUTES

THE BIRTH OF CANADIAN INDIE: MONTREAL

November 20th, 2011

Montreal is, without question, Canada’s indie Mecca. Even aside from the Grammy/Juno/Polaris winners, Montreal has a wealth of indie talent these days — both homegrown and transplanted from elsewhere on the continent. Why is the city host to such musical bounty? Amy Millan of Stars describes the inspiring atmosphere of her adopted hometown:

“When you’re walking down the street and it’s covered in snow and there’s a clown juggling next to you in his crazy pants and everyone’s speaking French, you feel taken outside of your life.”

But there’s more behind Montreal’s colossal indie rep than just its European-tinged romance. And it hasn’t always been a bastion of independent music. In this episode of The Birth of Canadian Indie we’ll hear about Montreal in the 1980s, a time when underground music had few live venues and little support from the disco-loving public…

Click the link below to listen.

CBC Radio 3
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7:27 MINUTES

THE BIRTH OF CANADIAN INDIE: EDMONTON

September 20th, 2011

Affectionately referred to as “Dirt City” by many in its local music community, Edmonton inspires mixed feelings in its denizens. Its long winters and remoteness from Canada’s larger centres can make it a challenging place to live. Especially for touring musicians. But at the same time, the city produces some of Canada’s freshest and most innovative indie music. Edmonton country luminary Corb Lund says that Edmonton musicians are risk takers.

“It’s a little different than some other cities,” he says. “People are very willing to step out on a limb.”

And Edmonton indie has always been on the leading edge. Musicians in that city have been pushing boundaries and crossing genres since the early days of the underground music scene. In this episode of The Birth of Canadian Indie, we’ll hear about 1980s Edmonton, where the musical inventiveness resulted in a mash-up of country music with good, old-fashioned punk rock.

Click the link below to listen.

CBC Radio 3
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8:08 MINUTES

THE BIRTH OF CANADIAN INDIE: HALIFAX

April 15th, 2011

The early 90s Halifax pop explosion took everyone by surprise. Music fans countrywide were amazed to hear brilliant alt pop coming from a city we’d thought was all about the jigs and reels. Haligonian musicians were taken aback, too. Of course, they already knew their music scene was hot. For them, it was the media hysteria that came as a shock. Many who were around during the commotion agree that Al Tuck said it best in his song “One Day The Warner”:

“We was just little itty bitty little people in our little tiny corner ‘til one day the Warner Brothers came through town.”

And although there were major label deals aplenty, some of those itty bitty little people were lost in the backwash of all that hype. Have a listen to the first episode of a new series called The Birth of Canadian Indie, where we hear from some of the stars of the Halifax pop explosion and dig up a few gems that never managed to catch the major label wave.

Click the link below to listen.

CBC Radio 3
CLICK HERE FOR AUDIO
6:47 MINUTES