{ Radio }

THE BIRTH OF CANADIAN INDIE: EDMONTON

September 20th, 2011

Affectionately referred to as “Dirt City” by many in its local music community, Edmonton inspires mixed feelings in its denizens. Its long winters and remoteness from Canada’s larger centres can make it a challenging place to live. Especially for touring musicians. But at the same time, the city produces some of Canada’s freshest and most innovative indie music. Edmonton country luminary Corb Lund says that Edmonton musicians are risk takers.

“It’s a little different than some other cities,” he says. “People are very willing to step out on a limb.”

And Edmonton indie has always been on the leading edge. Musicians in that city have been pushing boundaries and crossing genres since the early days of the underground music scene. In this episode of The Birth of Canadian Indie, we’ll hear about 1980s Edmonton, where the musical inventiveness resulted in a mash-up of country music with good, old-fashioned punk rock.

Click the link below to listen.

CBC Radio 3
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8:08 MINUTES

THE BIRTH OF CANADIAN INDIE: HALIFAX

April 15th, 2011

The early 90s Halifax pop explosion took everyone by surprise. Music fans countrywide were amazed to hear brilliant alt pop coming from a city we’d thought was all about the jigs and reels. Haligonian musicians were taken aback, too. Of course, they already knew their music scene was hot. For them, it was the media hysteria that came as a shock. Many who were around during the commotion agree that Al Tuck said it best in his song “One Day The Warner”:

“We was just little itty bitty little people in our little tiny corner ‘til one day the Warner Brothers came through town.”

And although there were major label deals aplenty, some of those itty bitty little people were lost in the backwash of all that hype. Have a listen to the first episode of a new series called The Birth of Canadian Indie, where we hear from some of the stars of the Halifax pop explosion and dig up a few gems that never managed to catch the major label wave.

Click the link below to listen.

CBC Radio 3
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6:47 MINUTES

AN OVERNIGHT SENSATION: THE STORY OF FRASER AND DEBOLT

May 1st, 2010

The late 60s and early 70s were an exciting time in Canadian folk music. The festival scene was burgeoning across the country. Artists like Neil Young and Joni Mitchell were producing albums that would become legendary – while musicians on the fringes were experimenting with vibrant, genre-bending sounds that drew the energy of rock music into the traditional folk idiom.

This is the story of one of the ones who got away. Fraser and DeBolt produced two albums filled with unique and daring psychedelic folk during the early 70s. They had a devoted fan following, but never found mainstream success. Although Allan Fraser and Daisy DeBolt remain a footnote in Canadian music history, their first album, in particular, still resonates today with record connoisseurs and contemporary folk musicians.

Click the link below to listen.

Inside the Music, CBC Radio One and 2
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53:58 MINUTES / 8.1 MB

THE UPSIDE OF LYING

March 31st, 2009

We all know the old saying: “honesty is the best policy.” But is it really?
Definitely Not The Opera, CBC Radio One

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8:05 MINUTES / 4.7 MB

GO BIG OR GO HOME

January 10th, 2009

Some people like to go big, while others are more inclined to go home. So what’s the difference between these two types? Those larger-than-life personalities who never do things in half measures and aren’t afraid to risk it all… what’s their secret? And can the rest of us learn a little something from them?
Definitely Not The Opera, CBC Radio One

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7:35 MINUTES / 4.4 MB